Monday, 31 August 2015

Send on Behalf vs Send As Permissions

Both Send on Behalf and Send As are similar permissions, however, there is one difference between these two permissions. Send on Behalf will allow a user to send as another user, when an email message arrives, the email message that is being sent on behalf of the mailbox owner is displayed. For example, Morgan sends an email message on behalf of Kevin. On other hand, the Send As permission allow a user to send mail as another person, in this case, the recipient should have no idea about who sent the message. Send As permission can be more useful where you are send message as a mail-enabled distribution group (ex: support@org.com).

Consider the scenario:

- Admin1 has Send on Behalf permision on User1
- Admin2 has Send As permision on User2

If the "Admin1" send message as "User1" with Send on Behalf permission, the recipient receive the message with the From field "Admin1 on behalf of User1".

If the "Admin2" send message as "User2" with Send As permission, the recipient receive the message with the From field only "User1", the recipient should have no idea about "Admin2".

Grant Send on Behalf Permission:

We can grant send on behalf permissions for a mailbox user using the powershell cmdlet Set-Mailbox with the parameter GrantSendOnBehalfTo.

The following command grants "Morgan" send on behalf permission to Kevin’s mailbox.
Set-Mailbox "Kevin" -GrantSendOnBehalfTo @{add="Morgan"}

Grant Send As Permission:

We can grant Send As permission for a mailbox user using the Add-ADPermission powershell cmdlet. To perform this task, your account need to be added in the server roles Organization Management and Recipient Management.

The following command grants "Morgan" send as permission to Kevin’s mailbox.
Add-ADPermission -Identity "Kevin" -User "Morgan" -Extendedrights "Send As"
Read More...

Saturday, 29 August 2015

Powershell: Filter Return Values using Where-Object

We can use the cmdlet Where-Object to filter data returned by other cmdlets. The below command filter the result form Get-Process command and select processes which name is equal to "svchost".
Get-Process | Where-Object {$_.Name -eq "svchost"}
The below command looking for processes where handles were greater than or equal to 200
Get-Process | Where-Object {$_.handles -ge 200}
You can also use the -and and -or parameters.
Get-Process | Where-Object {$_.handles -gt 200 -and $_.name -eq "svchost"}
You can also filter by Boolean value (True/False).
Get-Service | Where-Object {$_.CanStop}
Get-Service | Where-Object { -not $_.CanStop}

Other useful conditional operators are:

-lt -- Less than
-le -- Less than or equal to
-gt -- Greater than
-ge -- Greater than or equal to
-eq -- Equal to
-ne -- Not equal to
-like -- Like; uses wildcards for pattern matching
Read More...

Powershell: Select –ExpandProperty

We use select-object command to get properties from powershell output. Things are always fine with select-object if select the single valued property, but if we select multi-valued property or grouped property, the powershell returns the result as comma-separated values, sometimes the value can not be readable format, in this case, we should use ExpandProperty to expand multi-valued (or grouped) property.

The below command returns the Dependent Services for the windows service EventSystem, the DependentServices property is multi-valued property, so the below command returns value as comma separated values.
 Get-Service | Where-Object {$_.Name -eq "EventSystem"} | Select DependentServices
You can expand the multi-valued property by using –ExpandProperty and get as separated values.
 Get-Service | Where-Object {$_.Name -eq "EventSystem"} | Select -ExpandProperty  DependentServices
Read More...

Set-Mailbox : No provisioning handler is installed.

I am receiving the error "No provisioning handler is installed" when I run the Set-Mailbox cmdlet in normal powershell console.
PS C:\Users\Morgan> Set-Mailbox "Kevin" -GrantSendOnBehalfTo "Morgan"
Set-Mailbox : No provisioning handler is installed.
At line:1 char:12
+ Set-Mailbox <<<<  "Kevin" -GrantSendOnBehalfTo "Morgan"
    + CategoryInfo          : NotSpecified: (:) [Set-Mailbox], InvalidOperationException
    + FullyQualifiedErrorId : 79CAD31B,Microsoft.Exchange.Management.RecipientTasks.SetMailbox
From this link Exchange 2010 Mailbox Role Install fails - No Provisioning Handler is Installed, I have got the below solution:
Make sure that your account is in the member of:

1. Exchange Organization Administrators (Organization Management group).

2. Local Administrators
I have added the user account into above two groups but still I faced the same error in Powershell console, but it is working well in Exchange Management Shell.
Read More...

Remove Send on Behalf Permissions with Powershell

We can remove send on behalf permissions from a mailbox user using the powershell cmdlet Set-Mailbox with the parameter GrantSendOnBehalfTo. Use the below command to remove send on behalf permission.
Set-Mailbox "[Identity]" -GrantSendOnBehalfTo @{remove="[User]"}
[Identity] - The name of the mailbox user from the send on behalf permission to be removed.
[User] - The user that has send on behalf permission.

The following command removes send on behalf permission of the user "Morgan" from Kevin’s mailbox.
Set-Mailbox "Kevin" -GrantSendOnBehalfTo @{remove="Morgan"}
You can also remove permission for multiple users by giving user names as comma separated values.
Set-Mailbox "Kevin" -GrantSendOnBehalfTo @{remove="User1","User2"}
You can check the final permissions by using below command.
Get-Mailbox "Kevin" | Select -ExpandProperty GrantSendOnBehalfTo | Select Name,Parent

Remove Send-on-Behalf permissions for multiple user mailboxes

We can use the exchange management powershell cmdlet Get-Mailbox to get specific set of user mailboxes and pipe the results to Set-Mailbox cmdlet. The following command removes send on behalf permission of the user "Morgan" from all the mailboxes.
Get-Mailbox | Set-Mailbox -GrantSendOnBehalfTo @{remove="Morgan"}
You can also apply filters in Get-Mailbox cmdlet to select particular set of users. The following command select mailbox users from TestOU and pipe the results to Set-Mailbox cmdlet to remove send on behalf rights.
Get-Mailbox | Where {$_.DistinguishedName -like "*OU=TestOU,DC=TestDomain,DC=com*"} |
Set-Mailbox -GrantSendOnBehalfTo @{remove="User1","User2"}

Read More...

Friday, 28 August 2015

Grant Send on Behalf Permissions with Powershell

We can set or grant send on behalf permissions for a mailbox user using the powershell cmdlet Set-Mailbox with the parameter GrantSendOnBehalfTo. Use the below command to set send on behalf permission.
Set-Mailbox "[Identity]" -GrantSendOnBehalfTo @{add="[User]"}
[Identity] - The name of the mailbox user on which the send on behalf permission to be added.
[User] - The user to be granted the send on behalf permission.

The following command grants "Morgan" send on behalf permission to Kevin’s mailbox.
Set-Mailbox "Kevin" -GrantSendOnBehalfTo @{add="Morgan"}
You can also grant permission for multiple users by giving user names as comma separated values.
Set-Mailbox "Kevin" -GrantSendOnBehalfTo @{add="User1","User2"}
The above commands add permission with existing send on behalf permissions and it does not overwrite the existing permissions (this is required for most cases). You can check the applied permissions by using below command.
Get-Mailbox "Kevin" | Select -ExpandProperty GrantSendOnBehalfTo | Select Name,Parent

Grant Send-on-Behalf permissions for multiple user mailboxes

We can use the exchange management powershell cmdlet Get-Mailbox to get specific set of user mailboxes and pipe the results to Set-Mailbox cmdlet. The following command grants send on behalf permission for "Morgan" to all the mailboxes.
Get-Mailbox | Set-Mailbox -GrantSendOnBehalfTo @{add="Morgan"}
You can also apply filters in Get-Mailbox cmdlet to select particular set of users. The following command select mailbox users from TestOU and pipe the results to Set-Mailbox cmdlet to set send on behalf rights.
Get-Mailbox | Where {$_.DistinguishedName -like "*OU=TestOU,DC=TestDomain,DC=com*"} |
Set-Mailbox -GrantSendOnBehalfTo @{add="User1","User2"}

Read More...

Grant Send on Behalf Permission using EMC

We can easily set or grant a user Send on Behalf permissions to another user's mailbox using the Exchange Management Console (EMC).

Follow the below steps to grant Send on Behalf rights:

1. Start the Exchange Management Console (EMC).
2. Open Recipient Configuration in the navigation pane, select and right click on the user mailbox you want give another user permissions to send on behalf of and select Properties.

How to Grant Send on Behalf Permission using EMC

3. Select the Mail Flow Settings tab and select Delivery Options and click Properties.

How to Set Send on Behalf Permission using EMC
4. Now, you can add or remove send on behalf permissions and click OK to save changes.

How to Set Send on Behalf Permission using EMC
Read More...

Thursday, 27 August 2015

Get System Information in C#

In C#, we can get system information like Operation System , Processor Architecture and Drive Details using the built-in class Environment and we can also extract information through WMI service.

Get System Information using Environment

The below C# function get system information using Environment method.
public static void ShowSystemInformation()
{
    StringBuilder systemInfo = new StringBuilder(string.Empty);

    systemInfo.AppendFormat("Operation System:  {0}\n", Environment.OSVersion);
    systemInfo.AppendFormat("Processor Architecture:  {0}\n", Environment.GetEnvironmentVariable("PROCESSOR_ARCHITECTURE"));
    systemInfo.AppendFormat("Processor Model:  {0}\n", Environment.GetEnvironmentVariable("PROCESSOR_IDENTIFIER"));
    systemInfo.AppendFormat("Processor Level:  {0}\n", Environment.GetEnvironmentVariable("PROCESSOR_LEVEL"));
    systemInfo.AppendFormat("SystemDirectory:  {0}\n", Environment.SystemDirectory);
    systemInfo.AppendFormat("ProcessorCount:  {0}\n", Environment.ProcessorCount);
    systemInfo.AppendFormat("UserDomainName:  {0}\n", Environment.UserDomainName);
    systemInfo.AppendFormat("UserName: {0}\n", Environment.UserName);
    //Drives
    systemInfo.AppendFormat("LogicalDrives:\n");
    foreach (System.IO.DriveInfo DriveInfo1 in System.IO.DriveInfo.GetDrives())
    {
        try
        {
            systemInfo.AppendFormat("\t Drive: {0}\n\t\t VolumeLabel: " +
                "{1}\n\t\t DriveType: {2}\n\t\t DriveFormat: {3}\n\t\t " +
                "TotalSize: {4}\n\t\t AvailableFreeSpace: {5}\n",
                DriveInfo1.Name, DriveInfo1.VolumeLabel, DriveInfo1.DriveType,
                DriveInfo1.DriveFormat, DriveInfo1.TotalSize, DriveInfo1.AvailableFreeSpace);
        }
        catch
        {
        }
    }
    systemInfo.AppendFormat("Version:  {0}", Environment.Version);
    Console.WriteLine(systemInfo);
    Console.ReadKey();
}

Output:

Operation System:  Microsoft Windows NT 6.1.7601 Service Pack 1
Processor Architecture:  AMD64
Processor Model:  Intel64 Family 6 Model 42 Stepping 7, GenuineIntel
Processor Level:  6
SystemDirectory:  C:\Windows\system32
ProcessorCount:  2
UserDomainName:  TESTDomain
UserName: Administrator
LogicalDrives:
  Drive: C:\
   VolumeLabel: 
   DriveType: Fixed
   DriveFormat: NTFS
   TotalSize: 43240292352
   AvailableFreeSpace: 10865721344
  Drive: D:\
   VolumeLabel: Local Disk
   DriveType: Fixed
   DriveFormat: NTFS
   TotalSize: 42183159808
   AvailableFreeSpace: 12267360256
  Drive: E:\
   VolumeLabel: VBOXADDITIONS_4.
   DriveType: CDRom
   DriveFormat: CDFS
   TotalSize: 64770048
   AvailableFreeSpace: 0
  Drive: F:\
   VolumeLabel: VBOX_Downloads
   DriveType: Network
   DriveFormat: VBoxSharedFolderFS
   TotalSize: 729626107904
   AvailableFreeSpace: 371810705408
Version:  2.0.50727.5420

Get System Information using WMI class in C#

The below C# function get system information using WMI class. You need to add reference
public static void SystemInformation()
{
    StringBuilder processorInfo = new StringBuilder(string.Empty);
    ManagementClass mgmntClass = new ManagementClass("Win32_OperatingSystem");
    ManagementObjectCollection mgmntObj = mgmntClass.GetInstances();
    PropertyDataCollection properties = mgmntClass.Properties;
    foreach (ManagementObject obj in mgmntObj)
    {
        foreach (PropertyData property in properties)
        {
            try
            {
                processorInfo.AppendLine(property.Name + ":  " +
                    obj.Properties[property.Name].Value.ToString());
            }
            catch
            {
            }
        }
        processorInfo.AppendLine();
    }
    Console.WriteLine(processorInfo);
    Console.ReadKey();
}

Output:

BootDevice:  \Device\HarddiskVolume1
BuildNumber:  7601
BuildType:  Multiprocessor Free
Caption:  Microsoft Windows Server 2008 R2 Enterprise 
CodeSet:  1252
CountryCode:  1
CreationClassName:  Win32_OperatingSystem
CSCreationClassName:  Win32_ComputerSystem
CSDVersion:  Service Pack 1
CSName:  DC1
CurrentTimeZone:  330
DataExecutionPrevention_32BitApplications:  True
DataExecutionPrevention_Available:  True
DataExecutionPrevention_Drivers:  True
DataExecutionPrevention_SupportPolicy:  3
Debug:  False
Description:  
Distributed:  False
EncryptionLevel:  256
ForegroundApplicationBoost:  2
FreePhysicalMemory:  284236
FreeSpaceInPagingFiles:  0
FreeVirtualMemory:  43384
InstallDate:  20140628143731.000000+330
LastBootUpTime:  20150826015035.016594+330
LocalDateTime:  20150827194243.001000+330
Locale:  0409
Manufacturer:  Microsoft Corporation
MaxNumberOfProcesses:  4294967295
MaxProcessMemorySize:  8589934464
MUILanguages:  System.String[]
Name:  Microsoft Windows Server 2008 R2 Enterprise |C:\Windows|\Device\Harddisk0\Partition3
NumberOfLicensedUsers:  0
NumberOfProcesses:  83
NumberOfUsers:  4
OperatingSystemSKU:  10
Organization:  
OSArchitecture:  64-bit
OSLanguage:  1033
OSProductSuite:  274
OSType:  18
Primary:  True
ProductType:  2
RegisteredUser:  Windows User
SerialNumber:  55041-507-1081103-84377
ServicePackMajorVersion:  1
ServicePackMinorVersion:  0
SizeStoredInPagingFiles:  0
Status:  OK
SuiteMask:  274
SystemDevice:  \Device\HarddiskVolume3
SystemDirectory:  C:\Windows\system32
SystemDrive:  C:
TotalVirtualMemorySize:  4093680
TotalVisibleMemorySize:  4095544
Version:  6.1.7601
WindowsDirectory:  C:\Windows
You can also get Processor and Drive information by using the WMI classes Win32_Processor and Win32_LogicalDisk.
Read More...

Tuesday, 25 August 2015

Remove Full Access Permissions from Mailbox using Powershell

We can use the Remove-MailboxPermission cmdlet to remove full access permissions from a user's mailbox. To perform this task, your account need to be added in the server roles Organization Management and Recipient Management.

Run the below command to load Exchange cmdlets to use the Remove-MailboxPermission cmdlet.
Add-PSSnapin *Exchange*
The following example removes user Morgan's full access rights from Kevin's mailbox.
Remove-MailboxPermission -Identity "Kevin" -User "Morgan" -AccessRights FullAccess -InheritanceType All
Identity - The name of the user on which the full access permission to be removed.
User - The mailbox that has the full access permission.

Remove Full Access Permissions for Bulk Users from Text file:

Use the below powershell script to remove full access permission for bulk exchange mailbox users from text file. First create the text file Mailboxes.txt which includes one mailbox in each line.
Get-Content C:\Mailboxes.txt | ForEach-Object{
 $mailbox = $_
 Remove-MailboxPermission -Identity $mailbox -User "Admin" -AccessRights FullAccess -InheritanceType All         -Confirm:$Y -WhatIf
}

Remove Full Access Permissions for multiple mailbox users:

Use the below powershell command to remove full access permission for multiple exchange mailbox users.
$mailboxes = "TestUser1","TestUser2"
$mailboxes  | ForEach-Object{
 $mailbox = $_
 Remove-MailboxPermission -Identity $mailbox -User "Admin" -AccessRights FullAccess -InheritanceType All         -Confirm:$Y -WhatIf
}
Read More...

Grant Full Access Permissions to Mailbox using Powershell

We can set or grant full access permissions for a exchange mailbox user using the Add-MailboxPermission powershell cmdlet. To perform this task, your account need to be added in the server roles Organization Management and Recipient Management.

Run the below command to load Exchange cmdlets to use the Add-MailboxPermission cmdlet.
Add-PSSnapin *Exchange*
The following example grants "Morgan" full access permission to Kevin’s mailbox.
Add-MailboxPermission -Identity "Kevin" -User "Morgan" -AccessRights FullAccess -InheritanceType All
Identity - The name of the user on which the full access permission should be added.
User - The mailbox that should be granted the permission.

Set Full Access Permissions for Bulk Users from Text file:

Use the below powershell script to configure full access permission for bulk exchange mailbox users from text file. First create the text file Mailboxes.txt which includes one mailbox in each line.
Get-Content C:\Mailboxes.txt | ForEach-Object{
 $mailbox = $_
 Add-MailboxPermission -Identity $mailbox -User "Admin" -AccessRights FullAccess -InheritanceType All
}

Configure Full Access Permissions for multiple Mailboxes:

Use the below powershell command to grant full access permission for multiple exchange mailbox users.
$mailboxes = "TestUser1","TestUser2"
$mailboxes  | ForEach-Object{
 $mailbox = $_
  Add-MailboxPermission -Identity $mailbox -User "Admin" -AccessRights FullAccess -InheritanceType All
}
Read More...

Saturday, 8 August 2015

Set Environment Variable using Powershell Script

We can get, set, modify and remove environment variables using the .NET class [Environment]. The following command list all the environment variables.
[Environment]::GetEnvironmentVariables()
You can also use the below .NET function to return the value of particular environment variable:
[Environment]::GetEnvironmentVariable("Temp","User")
Temp - The name of the environment variable we want to retrieve;
User - The type of environment variable. The User type is an environment variable tied to a user profile. You can also retrieve Machine environment variables by passing the parameter "Machine".

Create/Set Environment Variable:

We can create two kinds of variables, process-level environment variable (temporary) and permanent environment variable.

Process-level Environment variable (temporary):

The process-level environment variable is a temporary variable, its value lasts only as long as your current powershell session alive. Use the below command to create a temporary environment variable.
$Env:TestVariable = "This is a temporary environment variable."

Permanent Environment variable:

To create a permanent environment variable you need to use the .NET method SetEnvironmentVariable . The below command creates a user-level environment variable named TestVariable:
[Environment]::SetEnvironmentVariable("TestVariable", "This is a permanent variable.", "User")
If TestVariable does not exist. powershell will create the new environment variable. If TestVariable already exist, then powershell will update the value "This is a permanent variable." in TestVariable.

Delete/Remove Environment Variables:

We can remove Environment variable if it no longer needed, by using Remove-Item cmdlet.
Remove-Item Env:\TestVariable
You can also remove Environment variable by assigning the variable value as null using SetEnvironmentVariable method:
[Environment]::SetEnvironmentVariable("TestVariable",$null,"User")
But, if you use SetEnvironmentVariable method to remove, the deleted variable might still show up when you call Get-ChildItem, at least until you restart powershell. But the environment variable will no longer exist when you call GetEnvironmentVariables.
[Environment]::GetEnvironmentVariable("TestVariable","User")
Read More...

Friday, 7 August 2015

Powershell Get Environment variable from Remote machine

We can find and list the environment variables using the .NET class [Environment]. The following command list all the environment variables in local machine.
[Environment]::GetEnvironmentVariables()
We can also list only computer specific environment variables or user specific environment variables by using below commands
[Environment]::GetEnvironmentVariables("Machine")
[Environment]::GetEnvironmentVariables("User")
Instead of listing all the environment variables, we can get the value of specific environment variable by using the function "[Environment]::GetEnvironmentVariable".
[Environment]::GetEnvironmentVariable("ComputerName")

Get Environment variable from Remote machine:

We can get an environment variable from remote machine by running the above commands using Invoke-Command. Before proceed, we should enable powershell remoting to run remote commands. Read this article : How to enable Powershell Remoting

Syntax of remote powershell command:

Invoke-Command -ComputerName $Target -ScriptBlock { $COMMAND } -Credential $USERNAME
$Target - The name of the computer to connect.
$COMMAND - The powershell command to run in remote computer.
$USERNAME - The user account to run the command as on the remote computer. You will be prompted to enter a password for the username. The Credential parameter is optional one.

The following command gets the name of the remote machine.
Invoke-Command -ComputerName "ESVR01" -ScriptBlock {[Environment]::GetEnvironmentVariable(“ComputerName”)}
The below command gets the "Temp" directory path of the remote computer "ESVR01".
Invoke-Command -ComputerName "ESVR01" -ScriptBlock {[Environment]::GetEnvironmentVariable(“Temp”,”Machine”)}
The below command gets the "Temp" directory path for the user "Kevin" in the remote machine "ESVR01".
Invoke-Command -ComputerName "ESVR01" -ScriptBlock {[Environment]::GetEnvironmentVariable(“Temp”,”User”)} -Credential Kevin
Read More...

Powershell - Get Environment Variables using Get-Childitem

We can get the complete list of environment variables using Get-Childitem cmdlet. The following command list all the local environment variables.
Get-ChildItem Env:
Instead of listing all the environment variables, you can also get the value of specific environment variable by passing the specified variable name.

The below command gets the current computer name.
Get-Childitem Env:computername
Read More...

Get list of environment variables from Powershell

We can get the list of environment variables using the .NET class [Environment]::. The following command list all the local environment variables.
[Environment]::GetEnvironmentVariables()
You can list machine specific environment variables or user specific environment variables using this function. The below command lists only computer specific environment variables
[Environment]::GetEnvironmentVariables("Machine")
Likewise, the below command lists only user specific environment variables
[Environment]::GetEnvironmentVariables("User")

Find specific (single) environment variable:

Instead of listing all the environment variables, we can use the function "[Environment]::GetEnvironmentVariable" to get the value of specific environment variable.
[Environment]::GetEnvironmentVariable("ComputerName")
The below command gets the current user's "Temp" directory path.
[Environment]::GetEnvironmentVariable("Temp","User")
Likewise, the below command gets the current computer's "Temp" directory path.
[Environment]::GetEnvironmentVariable("Temp","Machine")

Get environment variable from Remote machine:

We can get an environment variable from remote machine by running the above command using Invoke-Command. Before proceed, we should enable powershell remoting to run remote commands. Check this article : How to enable Powershell Remoting

Syntax of remote powershell command:

Invoke-Command -ComputerName $Target -ScriptBlock { $COMMAND } -Credential $USERNAME
$Target - The name of the computer to connect.
$COMMAND - The powershell command to run in remote computer.
$USERNAME - The user account to run the command as on the remote computer. You will be prompted to enter a password for the username. The Credential parameter is optional one.

The following command gets the name of the remote machine.
Invoke-Command -ComputerName "ESVR1" -ScriptBlock {[Environment]::GetEnvironmentVariable(“ComputerName”)}
The below command gets the "Temp" directory path of the remote computer "ESVR1".
Invoke-Command -ComputerName "ESVR1" -ScriptBlock {[Environment]::GetEnvironmentVariable(“Temp”,”Machine”)}
The below command gets the "Temp" directory path for the user "Morgan" in the remote machine "ESVR1".
Invoke-Command -ComputerName "ESVR1" -ScriptBlock {[Environment]::GetEnvironmentVariable(“Temp”,”User”)} -Credential Morgan
Read More...

Wednesday, 5 August 2015

Remove Send As Permissions from Mailbox using Powershell

We can remove Send As Permissions from a exchange mailbox for a particular Admin user using the Remove-ADPermission powershell cmdlet. To perform this task, your account need to be added in the server roles Organization Management and Recipient Management.

Before proceed, run the following command to enable Exchange cmdlets if you are working with Powershell console instead of Exchange Management Shell.
Add-PSSnapin *Exchange*
Use the following command to remove "Send As Permissions"
Remove-ADPermission -Identity "Kevin" -User "Morgan" -Extendedrights "Send As" -Confirm:$False
Identity - The name of the mailbox on which the Send As permission should be removed.
User - The name of the user object that will have permissions to be removed.

Remove Send As Permissions from multiple Mailboxes:

Use the below powershell command to remove Send As Permission from multiple exchange mailbox users.
$mailboxes = "TestUser1","TestUser2"
$mailboxes  | ForEach-Object{
 $mailbox = $_
 Remove-ADPermission -Identity $mailbox -User "Morgan" -Extendedrights "Send As" -Confirm:$False
}
Read More...